Lab Seminar "Bring quality value into fishery reform: the optimal age-selectivity regulation for trawl fisheries in China"

Kaiwen is introducing us the small yellow croaker.
Kaiwen is introducing us the small yellow croaker.

ARE student Kaiwen Wang shared his research on regulations for trawl fisheries in China. Despite strong evidence of over-fishing, China’s fisheries have maintained a steady rate of growth for decades and become one of the largest producers in the world seafood market. On the other side, most of the marine catch in China are small fishes of low market value and high productivity. By leaving more young fish in the sea, a reform in gear selectivity can slow down the pace of “growth overfishing” and improve the economic potential for the whole industry. The presentation will first take a glance at the development, features, and problems of China’s fishery, and then shift focus to a case of a trawl fishery on East China Sea.  A bioeconomic model based on age-structured population dynamics and size-dependent pricing can help evaluate the management gain for a regime shift in gear control.