Lab Seminar: "The equilibrium dynamics of multispecies fisheries are sensitive to the rate of change in human intervention"

Jack is talking about rates of change.
Jack is talking about rates of change.

ESP student Jack Buckner presented his research on fish population dynamics. Human activities have large impacts on the population and community dynamics of marine fish; furthermore, changes in policy and economic incentives can cause rapid changes in the ways humans interact with these systems. In this presentation Jack explores how these rapid changes in human activities may affect the long run population dynamics of targeted species. In particular he shows that the equilibrium state of multiple exploited stocks can depend on that rate at which fishing effort is changed (increased or decreased) across species. Jack uses recent mathematical results from the theory of nonautonomous dynamical systems to prove that simple predator prey models can exhibit this rate dependent behavior (R tipping), and use these simple models to make inferences about when naturally occurring population my exhibit these complex dynamics. In general Jack finds that R tipping is most likely to occur in populations that have been heavily exploited, or if the target species have strong interactions and large differences is generation time.